Center for Gerontology

FAQs

Why Should I Study Gerontology?

Gerontology offers excellent career opportunities in a field of growing social and economic significance.

One out of every eight persons in America is now age 65 or older. This is the fastest growing segment of the population, and the trend is projected to continue for decades ahead. As a result, analysts predict the creation of 900,000 additional jobs in gerontology and related fields in the coming years. Employees who fill these jobs will need a background in gerontology in order to develop policies and programs and to conduct research that will effectively respond to the specific needs of older adults in such areas as:

  • Adult Day Services
  • Advocacy
  • Continuing Education
  • Family Therapy
  • Financial Counseling
  • Health Care
  • Leisure and Physical Activities
  • Nutrition
  • Paid and Volunteer Work
  • Program Administration
  • Psychological Services
  • Research
  • Social Services
 

Certificate students complete courses in social, psychological, and physical aspects of aging and select electives that enable them to tailor their studies to accommodate their interests. The curriculum includes a practicum and research on a topic in gerontology. Students can normally fit the requirements for the certificate into their program of study so that the time needed to complete the graduate degree in their discipline is not extended by simultaneously pursuing the certificate.